Kenny Slaught Explains The Elements Of Hispanic Architecture

A United States architectural movement recognised as the Spanish Colonial Revival architecture began in the early 20th century. The movement covered designing some cities that were the former Spanish colonies, which later became American cities, using the Spanish architectural style. A major part of this architectural style can be seen in California. Santa Barbara used this style as its signature line for re-designing the city after an earthquake that took place in 1925.  Architect George Washington Smith moved to Montecito and commercialized this movement introduced this style. The history of El Pueblo Viejo aesthetic control remains in line with the Roman and Parisian laws. It tries to keep history together through the Hispanic architecture. Nevertheless, you may be inquisitive as to what the Hispanic Architecture is all about. This style is significantly influenced by the architecture of the “white-washed cities” of Andalusia in Southern Spain. In Santa Barbara, local building techniques are an outcome of the natural environment and the supplies available in the locality. Kenny Slaught says that Hispanic architectural types in this area are characterized by the “minimalism, rural economy, excellence in craftsmanship and direct expression of material”. Designs seen in Santa Barbara display local handmade quality related to the sunlight. Furthermore, colors are also similar to the natural environment, yellow, red, orange and white that remains Santa Barbara’s weather.

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Santa Barbara Is Famous For Its Rich Architectural Legacy – Kenny Slaught

Santa Barbara’s fame as a touristic city that entices thousands of visitors each year is a renowned fact. Mostly known for its pleasant weather, spectacular landscapes and particularly for its remarkably rich architectural heritage. Santa Barbara’s constriction designs do not display the similarity of the conventional American architecture because its origins have arisen from the Spanish constructions during the colonization period. Thanks to the city’s flawless architecture portrayed by the touch of ancient days, historic preservation was considered as an essential element in the city planning process. Santa Barbara was one of the earliest communities in the United States that further showcased the historical footprint observed in the local architectural patterns and styles. Famous property developer and successful businessman, Kenny Slaught has thrown insights on the history of Santa Barbara’s architecture by drawing upon the chronology of events that took place in the area. On his blog at KennySlaughtNews.com, the well-known industry executive has shared a brief timeline of milestones in efforts to help accelerate curious readers’ search for knowledge on the roots of local architecture.    

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Kenny Slaught Promotes Programs Offered By Hospice Of Santa Barbara

Respected thought leader, company strategist and property investor, Kenny Slaught is committed to assisting individuals and groups in need throughout his area. Following his life philosophy as a visionary philanthropist, he continues to support the Hospice of Santa Barbara and several of their community-centric initiatives – including counseling and support services. As he wishes to grow public awareness about the importance of social support, especially for people suffering the loss of their beloved, Slaught has recently promoted these programs by posting on his blog at KennySlaught.com.

Read more: http://markets.financialcontent.com/startribune/news/read/33555035/Kenny_Slaught_

Kenny Slaught Elaborates Hoover Dam’s Roots

Explaining Hoover Dam’s history Kenny Slaught says that the radical structure was made during the American Great Depression period, between 1931 and 1936, costing the government $49 million dollars. Previously, the dam was named Boulder Dam, but was  called Hoover Dam eventually as a tribute to the then-President Herbert Hoover, who had made big contributions to the establishment of this great development. With 221 meters in height, 379 meters in length, and more than 35.000 cubic kilometers of full capacity, the gigantic structure could produce more than 4,2 billion kWh2 per year.

Read more: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/kenny-slaught-societal-importance-hoover-230600215.html